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PCD - Post Camp Depression

PCD - Post Camp Depression

Author -  Tim Bain

PCD - Post Camp Depression

It's cold, it's wet, it is dark by 7pm, things are expensive, boredom is constant and something just doesn't feel right. 

Welcome to the wonderful world of P.C.D or Post camp depression. For the last few months you have been living it up, having a constant stream of activities, have never been bored, have been challenged, have grown up faster than you ever thought, were left in charged of a group of kids and at the end of it all probably had the time of your life travelling with new friends all over America but now it has all ended and you are back in the real world, it just really, in blunt terms: sucks!

tim at camp america.jpg

 

Here is the thing, there are a multitude of reasons why PCD happens. 

It is a recognised thing, just do a google search and the amount of pages that comes up about this topic is astounding. The main reason for it is tiredness. For seven weeks you have been getting up at an hour that seemed unthinkable before you left and you worked, you worked for up to 16 hours in the day and it was high energy work. You didn't stop. 

Then when camp did stop you went travelling and we all know that travelling is generally just one big party with even longer hours. So while travelling you didn't stop. Then there was the flight home, across a continent, 13 hours to get back to New Zealand in a cramped plane with people you don't know, you hardly slept, so once again, on the plane, you didn't stop. Then you got home and guess what, you stopped.

Tim Bain.jpg

 

Yes, you finally stopped. And that right there is where PCD comes and starts to play havoc with you. 

You finally catch up on months worth of sleep, your jet lagged body doesn't want you to sleep and as we all know with tiredness our emotions get enchanced which takes us quite well into the next stage of PDC, missing camp. 

Missing camp is totally normal, hey, it is even normal to cry a bit. You have created connections with people in another country that more than likely you will never see again. You put your heart and soul into looking after a group of kids for a period of time and you may of even fallen in love and found mister or mrs right, or if not then maybe mister or mrs right now. 

Here is what a lot of people don't understand that haven't been to camp. You are living with the same people for seven weeks, they don't understand that in that time you learn every small detail about people. You know people at camp better than you know your best friends at home, that is hard for people to understand, but don't expect them to.

They say that we should prepare for culture shock on the way to camp, however, culture shock coming back is often more of a challenge, who would of thought? Who would imagine that you would crave something as mundane as Applebee's or Chilli's? 

Do you crave a random late night trip to Walmart to buy something that you didn't really need? Or do you just miss the fact that nothing is open past 10pm in this country? These are all things that you CAN NOT control, move onto the things that you can control.

Tim 2.jpg

Keep busy, this is the biggest things to do. 

Keep busy, every year when I have returned from camp I have been to the movies more times that I have cared to, seen movies that I didn't really want to see. I even went to them by myself in the middle of the day (try it, its a challenge the first time but it is strangely invigorating) See all your friends that you missed while at camp, make new friends, go to parties, go to events you wouldn't normally. 

Really get involved in the world at home. By doing thing you are keeping your mind off of what you left behind.

At the end of it all PCD is a short lived thing, once you have caught up on the sleep, been out with your 'real world' friends, settled back into your job or university PCD will no longer be in your world. Yes, it will re surface at times when a photo gets uploaded on facebook, or you get a message from someone from another country. Even in my eight years it has become easier to keep in touch with people: Skype, Facebook, iMessage, facetime and email are amazing tools to keep in touch with people, use it and use it well.

Finally, if someone says, that PCD doesn't exist, ask them to do this. Ask them to imagine a time they came back from holiday, ask them how long it was, then ask, how did they feel when they came back. Finally, tell them to times that feeling by three months and that is what PCD feels like and remember, you can always go back next year! Camp doesn't go anywhere...


- By Tim Bain

 

PCD - Post Camp Depression

It's cold, it's wet, it is dark by 7pm, things are expensive, boredom is constant and something just doesn't feel right. Welcome to the wonderful world of P.C.D or Post camp depression.

PCD - Post Camp Depression

It's cold, it's wet, it is dark by 7pm, things are expensive, boredom is constant and something just doesn't feel right. 

Welcome to the wonderful world of P.C.D or Post camp depression. For the last few months you have been living it up, having a constant stream of activities, have never been bored, have been challenged, have grown up faster than you ever thought, were left in charged of a group of kids and at the end of it all probably had the time of your life travelling with new friends all over America but now it has all ended and you are back in the real world, it just really, in blunt terms: sucks!

tim at camp america.jpg

 

Here is the thing, there are a multitude of reasons why PCD happens. 

It is a recognised thing, just do a google search and the amount of pages that comes up about this topic is astounding. The main reason for it is tiredness. For seven weeks you have been getting up at an hour that seemed unthinkable before you left and you worked, you worked for up to 16 hours in the day and it was high energy work. You didn't stop. 

Then when camp did stop you went travelling and we all know that travelling is generally just one big party with even longer hours. So while travelling you didn't stop. Then there was the flight home, across a continent, 13 hours to get back to New Zealand in a cramped plane with people you don't know, you hardly slept, so once again, on the plane, you didn't stop. Then you got home and guess what, you stopped.

Tim Bain.jpg

 

Yes, you finally stopped. And that right there is where PCD comes and starts to play havoc with you. 

You finally catch up on months worth of sleep, your jet lagged body doesn't want you to sleep and as we all know with tiredness our emotions get enchanced which takes us quite well into the next stage of PDC, missing camp. 

Missing camp is totally normal, hey, it is even normal to cry a bit. You have created connections with people in another country that more than likely you will never see again. You put your heart and soul into looking after a group of kids for a period of time and you may of even fallen in love and found mister or mrs right, or if not then maybe mister or mrs right now. 

Here is what a lot of people don't understand that haven't been to camp. You are living with the same people for seven weeks, they don't understand that in that time you learn every small detail about people. You know people at camp better than you know your best friends at home, that is hard for people to understand, but don't expect them to.

They say that we should prepare for culture shock on the way to camp, however, culture shock coming back is often more of a challenge, who would of thought? Who would imagine that you would crave something as mundane as Applebee's or Chilli's? 

Do you crave a random late night trip to Walmart to buy something that you didn't really need? Or do you just miss the fact that nothing is open past 10pm in this country? These are all things that you CAN NOT control, move onto the things that you can control.

Tim 2.jpg

Keep busy, this is the biggest things to do. 

Keep busy, every year when I have returned from camp I have been to the movies more times that I have cared to, seen movies that I didn't really want to see. I even went to them by myself in the middle of the day (try it, its a challenge the first time but it is strangely invigorating) See all your friends that you missed while at camp, make new friends, go to parties, go to events you wouldn't normally. 

Really get involved in the world at home. By doing thing you are keeping your mind off of what you left behind.

At the end of it all PCD is a short lived thing, once you have caught up on the sleep, been out with your 'real world' friends, settled back into your job or university PCD will no longer be in your world. Yes, it will re surface at times when a photo gets uploaded on facebook, or you get a message from someone from another country. Even in my eight years it has become easier to keep in touch with people: Skype, Facebook, iMessage, facetime and email are amazing tools to keep in touch with people, use it and use it well.

Finally, if someone says, that PCD doesn't exist, ask them to do this. Ask them to imagine a time they came back from holiday, ask them how long it was, then ask, how did they feel when they came back. Finally, tell them to times that feeling by three months and that is what PCD feels like and remember, you can always go back next year! Camp doesn't go anywhere...


- By Tim Bain

 
PCD - Post Camp Depression

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